Materia Medica: Yarrow

yarrow02-l

A valuable tool for any herbalist, “Achillea” said to be named for the mythological, Achilles, was first used by the Greek over 3000 years ago as a way to staunch bleeding wounds during battle.  The fern-like leaves can be used to treat anything from toothaches, fevers, and digestion to the prevention of gall stones.  Drying in nature, a tea made from yarrow is an excellent way to combat colds and coughs as well as a decongestant for sinus infections.

 

Botanical/ Common Name:

Achillea millefolium/ Yarrow, Milfoil, Soldier’s Woundwort

Family:

Asteraceae

Hardiness Zone:

3-9

Height/Width:

2-4 ft/ 8-24in

Parts Used:

Aerial parts and roots

Taste/ Smell:

Bitter, Aromatic, Pungent

Tendencies:

Cooling, Drying

Indications:

Antiallergenic, antibacterial, anticatarrhal, anti-inflammatory, antispasmodic, antiulcerogenic, antiviral, aperient, appetite stimulant, astringent, bitter, carminiative, cholagogue, diaphoretic, diuretic, emmenagogue, febrifuge, hemostatic, hypoglycemic, hypotensive, stomachic, vascular tonic, vulnerary

Contraindications:

DO NOT use during pregnancy, contact dermatitis can occur, constituents can cause nausea, stomach cramps, urine retention

Uses:

Bitter tonic, antiseptic, anti-fungal, astringent, styptic, stimulating diaphoretic, anti-inflammatory, Anodyne

Dosage:

Infusion: 1 tsp per cup of water or 1:1 fresh; liquid extract: 10-30 drops 1-4 times daily

Interactions:

No known interactions

 

 

 

Sources:

Featured Image: http://www.coolgarden.me

Spiraea Herbs; Materia Medica; The Farmer’s Almanac

 

 

 

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